Evaluation of the fate and pathological response in the lung and pleura of brake dust alone and in combination with added chrysotile compared to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure

By |2020-09-11T20:30:57-04:00January 2nd, 2015|

Evaluation of the fate and pathological response in the lung and pleura of brake dust alone and in combination with added chrysotile compared to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure (2015) Abstract This study was designed to provide an understanding of the biokinetics and potential [...]

Evaluation of the deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake dust with and without added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation: Interim results

By |2020-09-11T20:31:36-04:00January 28th, 2014|

Evaluation of the deposition, translocation and pathological response of brake dust with and without added chrysotile in comparison to crocidolite asbestos following short-term inhalation: Interim results (2014) Abstract Chrysotile has been frequently used in the past in manufacturing brakes and continues to be used in [...]

Quantification of the pathological response and fate in the lung and pleura of chrysotile in combination with fine particles compared to amosite-asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure

By |2020-09-11T20:32:25-04:00June 3rd, 2011|

Quantification of the pathological response and fate in the lung and pleura of chrysotile in combination with fine particles compared to amosite-asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure (2011) Abstract The marked difference in biopersistence and pathological response between chrysotile and amphibole asbestos has been well documented. [...]

The pathological response and fate in the lung and pleura of chrysotile in combination with fine particles compared to amosite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure: interim results

By |2020-09-11T20:35:02-04:00August 9th, 2010|

The pathological response and fate in the lung and pleura of chrysotile in combination with fine particles compared to amosite asbestos following short-term inhalation exposure: interim results (2010) Abstract The pathological response and translocation of a commercial chrysotile product similar to that which was used through the mid-1970s [...]

The Toxicological Response of Brazilian Chrysotile Asbestos: A Multidose Subchronic 90-Day Inhalation Toxicology Study with 92-Day Recovery to Assess Cellular and Pathological Response

By |2020-09-11T20:36:31-04:00October 6th, 2008|

The Toxicological Response of Brazilian Chrysotile Asbestos: A Multidose Subchronic 90-Day nhalation Toxicology Study with 92-Day Recovery to Assess Cellular and Pathological Response (2008) Abstract Inhalation toxicology studies with chrysotile asbestos have in the past been performed at exceedingly high doses without consideration of fiber [...]

The Biopersistence of Brazilian Chrysotile Asbestos Following Inhalation 2004

By |2020-09-11T20:37:15-04:00October 19th, 2004|

The Biopersistence of Brazilian Chrysotile Asbestos Following Inhalation (2004) Abstract With the initial understanding of the relationship of asbestos to disease, little information was available on whether the two different groups of minerals that are called asbestos were of similar or different potency in causing [...]

The Biopersistence of Canadian Chrysotile Asbestos Following Inhalation

By |2020-09-11T20:37:59-04:00October 1st, 2003|

The Biopersistence of Canadian Chrysotile Asbestos Following Inhalation (2003) Abstract Chrysotile asbestos is often included with other asbestos materials in evaluation and classification. However, chrysotile is a serpentine with markedly different physical and chemical characteristics in comparison to amphiboles (e.g., crocidolite, amosite, tremolite). In contrast [...]

In Situ Microscopic Analysis of Asbestos and Synthetic Vitreous Fibers Retained in Hamster Lungs following Inhalation

By |2020-09-11T20:38:43-04:00March 26th, 1999|

In Situ Microscopic Analysis of Asbestos and Synthetic Vitreous Fibers Retained in Hamster Lungs following Inhalation (1999) Abstract Hamsters breathed, nose-only, for 13 weeks, 5 days/week, 6 hr/day, either man-made vitreous fiber (MMVF)lO>a, MMVF33, or long amosite asbestos at approximately 300 World Health Organization (WHO) [...]